Many families across the United States own dogs. Many individuals may agree that dogs provide companionship and a sense of responsibility. In rare occurrences, however, dogs lash out and severely injure adults and children, and medical procedures and lawsuits may result. Laws provide justice in personal injury disputes, but they also uphold reimbursement for injury under premises liability.

It is your right to feel safe from harm when you legally entering someone’s property.

How premises liability protects you

Premises liability explains that to prevent injury on any property, owners should exercise care when dealing with dangerous or defective property aspects. These aspects include repairing uneven stairs, filling cracked driveways to prevent tripping and even notifying guests of the potential for crime around the property.

Preventing hazardous issues on property also includes protecting guests from pets. Though you may not believe your animal would ever hurt an individual, an animal’s inability to communicate can leave you with devastating outcomes. Certain animals designate serious risk based on circumstances.

According to the City of Louisville government, at-risk dogs include a dog that either:

  • Threatens the safety of individuals
  • Causes injury to any individual or other animal
  • Is not found leashed

At the owner’s expense

Should the court determine negligence of the owner, a court may order the owner to pay damages due to an attack.

Damages may include:

  • All medical expenses due to the injury
  • Harm to property of the guest
  • Payments for pain and suffering

Further, a Kentucky statute states that if a dog attacks an individual, it may be legal to kill the animal to save the person under threatening circumstances. Not only may a negligent owner lose money due to court-ordered fees, potential exists for a bystander to legally kill the dog in an attack.

Premises liability enforces blame in a situation that may seem accidental. It proves essential to understand the expectations of the law to protect guests on property. Further, should you or a family member be attacked by a dog, know that regulations require damages to be paid to compensate for all related suffering.