Truckers in Kentucky and across the U.S. work long hours, and consequently, they run the risk of driving drowsy. Many, to avoid this, will consume large amounts of caffeine on a regular basis. A recent study, conducted by a transport safety lecturer and the Virginia Tech Transportation Institute, has stated that this habit may do more harm than good.

For their study, researchers focused on truck drivers on opposite ends of the caffeine consumption spectrum: those who consume only one cup, glass or pill of coffee or another caffeinated beverage each day, and those who consume more than five. A total of 3,007 truckers from eight different states were analyzed. They answered a questionnaire and were assured that their responses would not be shared with their employers.

These participants were asked if they were in a crash in the past three years, and 21.6% of the low caffeine consumers said yes. By contrast, 27.8% of the high caffeine consumers said yes. Moreover, the second group reported having poorer health than the first. Many of these truckers would get poor sleep, smoke, drink excessively and fail to eat healthy.

Researchers cannot confirm there’s a cause and effect relationship between caffeine consumption and crash risk. Future studies could check, though, whether the “tipping point” is where caffeine consumption leads to unsafe behaviors.

When motor vehicle accidents involve a large truck, the injuries tend to be catastrophic. Kentucky being a no-fault state, only those who suffer severe injuries can usually file a third-party insurance claim. To see what their options are for seeking compensation, victims who are not to blame for their injuries may want to speak with an attorney. The attorney may negotiate on their behalf for a settlement with the trucking company’s legal team, litigating if one cannot be achieved.